(International-220) March 25, 2019 – Trains in India are the slowest in the world! Punctuality?

indiarailway

PERSONAL NOTE: ” India
, a nation famous for its lax attitude towards punctuality, “Indian Standard Time” is a standard tongue-in-cheek excuse for being late to any event…India’s rail system is among the busiest in world. Unfortunately, it’s also among the most inefficient and is notorious for hours-long delays and slow customer service…” AS A VISITING professor in China, I felt many times, my students were never on time for a dinner engagement…imagine if you have to cook a dinner…most times I would take them out to eat…but many were never on time…So, maybe it is also true in China…punctuality is not valued as we are in USA. Businesses depend on you being on time to work! Steve, usa, peace, March 25 monday, 2019   stephenehling@hotmail.com    (blog) https://getting2knowyou-china.com

 

 

Japan defends it, Vietnam stretches it, India ignores it. In Asia, time really is relative
• If you’ve ever wondered about the relativity of time just take a ride on India’s New Jalpaiguri Express
• Chances are you’ll find an extra 20 hours to while away – but it will feel like forever

, 17 Mar, 2019 Crystal Tai SCMP

ACROSS the WORLD, perceptions of time vary widely by culture. In
Japan
, where being on time is of utmost importance, punctuality is referred to as jikangenshu – which loosely translates as “strictly defending time”. But over in Southeast Asian nations such as
Vietnam
and
Indonesia
, time is viewed as a flexible commodity, and is often referred to as being “elastic” or “rubber”. And in
India
, a nation famous for its lax attitude towards punctuality, “Indian Standard Time” is a standard tongue-in-cheek excuse for being late to any event.

One of the best examples of Indian Standard Time, or IST, can be seen in the country’s expansive railway system. Made up of more than 7,349 stations, and servicing more than 8 billion passengers a year, India’s rail system is among the busiest in world. Unfortunately, it’s also among the most inefficient and is notorious for hours-long delays and slow customer service. In 2018, in the World Economic Forum’s ranking on train efficiency, it was a full 24 places behind Japan, which took second behind Switzerland.
But even that ranking looks flattering when you consider the New Jalpaiguri Express (NJP), which is infamous for tardiness. The train, which crosses Darjeeling and takes travellers as far as Bhutan and Nepal, took the dubious honour of being India’s most delayed train in the last half of 2018. According to the local press, it is on average 20 hours behind schedule.
Social media is full of less than glowing reviews of the NJP. “It’s actually three hours delayed now. Halting at every station. Unable to understand why you call it an express when it’s running like a local train,” said Twitter user Arnab Roy in a complaint aimed at Railway Minister Piyush Goyal.
India’s culture of tardiness extends beyond its late-running trains, and has a very real economic impact, according to Monica Verma, a former journalist and researcher specialising in the South Asian political economy at South Asian University in New Delhi. “The problem of tardiness definitely affects Indian growth where the bureaucratic delays and red tape-ism affect project delivery and execution,” she said.

A train started 7 hours late from New Jalpaiguri Railway Station named NJP UDZ express running more & more late on the way seems that no responsibility for the passengers near railway department

“Tardiness is a huge complaint that the private sector often has about the attitude of the administration. India is poorly linked with global value chains for the same reason.”
But as the old saying goes, time heals everything, and Verma has noticed a huge generational shift in how lateness is perceived in the country, with younger generations being increasingly conscious of the need for punctuality.

“India’s own entrepreneurs find it difficult to do business because of bureaucratic delays,” she said. “There have been improvements. But much needs to be done.” ■

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s