(China-125) Why China wants women to have more babies NOW..desperate policy!

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SPECIAL NOTE: During my 7 years as a visiting professor in China…very often I would see a phenomenon that is only True and Visible in China: grandparents taking care of their grandchildren! Why? I believe it started when China opened up in 1978 to the world, suddenly China was on the path to become the MANUFACTURER OF THE WORLD…yes, and that meant at the time more and more hands, especially from rural areas in China (remember over 60 % Chinese live in rural areas in China today) were required to do the work in factories to produce goods for the rest of the world…suddenly we saw influx of Chinese products all over the world…and Walmart seemed to be the place where you could buy and obtain MADE IN CHINA PRODUCTS! And so many young rural parents would leave their little babies with their older parents to raise them, because many young adults would be gone for a long time…returning home only during the Chinese New Year…once a year. And many did not have the financial means to travel, like they do today with all the speed trains and vast modern highways to take you to anywhere in China…well, the strange thing is that many women are not keen or interested in having more babies…ONE IS ENOUGH, AND THAT ONE HAS BECOME THE NORM, THE WOMEN SAY! Last year, they allow 2 children, this year they allow 3 children…too late, I fear, because many women are not interested to be tied down after 40 years of freedom forced to have one child!!!! But the Chinese government is facing a crisis: aging population and high cost of labor in China (not enough workers to do the job!)…Some people suggested China should do what the Japanese did: pay the women to have more babies! I guess the Chinese government can do that since they have the money to promote many other aspects of social and cultural advances in China! Think of this: many things in China are owned and controlled by the government…think of the 1,4 billion people, the consumers of all goods and services in China…think of the money coming to the government pockets!!!!!!!!! To that extent China is richer than any country under the sun! You have 1,4 potential consumers! All the telephones in China are owned by the government…over 900 millions users of the Internet and over 500 millions users of the cellphone, or more! Who is getting all the money? You guess it, the government! Steve, USA, August 29, 2018 stephenehling@hotmail.com    WeChat 1962816801 

 

 

China sends further signal on end to family size limits with revised civil code
New draft removes all references to ‘family planning’ as authorities explore ways to boost population growth
PUBLISHED : Tuesday, 28 August, 2018

Bloomberg USA
China’s parliament struck “family planning” policies from the latest draft of a sweeping civil code slated for adoption in 2020, the clearest signal yet that the leadership is moving to end limits on the number of children families can have.
A new draft of the Civil Code submitted on Monday to the Standing Committee of the National People’s Congress removed all “family planning-related content”, according a report published on Tuesday in the Communist Party’s People’s Daily newspaper.
That would suggest that the decades-old birth restrictions would not be enforced after the law went into effect, since the code is intended to govern all aspects of private life from contracts to company registrations to marriages.
Opinion: Three-child policy? China shouldn’t force women to have more babies
Bloomberg News reported in May that the country was planning to scrap birth limits as soon as this year. It would be a landmark end to a much criticised policy – one of history’s biggest social experiments – that left the world’s most-populous nation with a shortage of workers and an ageing population comprised of 30 million fewer women than men.
Demographic trends are weighing on President Xi Jinping’s efforts to develop China’s economy, driving up pension and health care costs and sending foreign companies looking elsewhere for labour. China’s State Council last year projected that about a quarter of its population will be 60 or older by 2030 – up from 13 per cent in 2010.
Uproar over plan to start baby boom in China by taxing adults under 40
Chinese health authorities are studying the possibility of financial incentives to boost population growth, local media reported in July.
That was a sign that policy could soon move toward encouraging child birth, some three years after limits were relaxed to allow families to have two children instead of one.
Such consequential decisions would require party approval, which could come as soon as an expected meeting of the party’s Central Committee in the fourth quarter of the year.
The final draft of the Civil Code was expected to be submitted to the National People’s Congress for passage in the first quarter of 2020.
“Family planning has always come first as policy and then become law,” said He Yafu, an independent demographer based in Guangdong and long-time advocate for policy changes.
“It is expected that the policy would be lifted by the party first, then the legal procedures would follow to remove it in relevant laws.”
Chinese drug firm starts ‘let’s have a baby’ campaign. Angry women say ‘let’s not’
Earlier this month, a Chinese government researcher predicted an end to restrictions on the number of children a family can have.
“It has become an irresistible trend to allow people to make their own decisions on fertility, which will be the direction for the adjustment of population policy in the future,” Zhang Juwei, director of the state-run Chinese Academy of Social Sciences’ Institute of Population and Labor Economics, told China Newsweek magazine.

This article appeared in the South China Morning Post print edition as: Beijing signals end to restrictions on family size by 2020

 

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